Research Question 3: Key Trends

What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the ways in which learning-focused institutions approach their core mission of teaching, learning, research, and service in K-12 education?

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Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: - Sam Sam Jul 1, 2013


Compose your entries like this:
  • Trend Name. Add your ideas here with a few of sentences description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!


  • The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is challenging us to revisit our roles as educators. Institutions must consider the unique value that schools add to a world in which information is everywhere, and generally free. In such a world, sense-making and the ability to assess the credibility of information are paramount. Mentoring and preparing students for the world in which they will live and work is again at the forefront. K-12 institutions have always been seen as critical paths to educational credentialing, but challenges from competing sources are redefining what these paths can look like. There will be a digital divide between students who have teachers that are experts in these areas and know how to find and make sense of this information. Exams and competency goals have to include this way of working, or else not much will happen. - Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Sep 22, 2013 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 22, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013- ingunn.kjol.wiig ingunn.kjol.wiig Sep 25, 2013- ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 28, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik When everything and nothing is a digital learning resource, life gets complicated - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 29, 2013 (- rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen Sep 29, 2013)
  • The cost of technology drops and school districts revise and open up their access policies, it is becoming more common for students to bring their own mobile devices. A growing number of schools are launching “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) programs so that students can use the devices they already own in class. This is happening as a result of how BYOD impacts budgets; schools can spend less money on technology overall if they focus their efforts on equipping the students who cannot afford their own devices. The relative new interest in BYOD programs has been accompanied by an attitude shift as schoolteachers and staff better understand the capabilities of smartphones and other devices that, unfortunately, still remain banned on many school campuses. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 19, 2013A number of county councils (responsible for upper secondary education) are now shifting to or considering shifting to various types of a BYOD regime In 2012, Denmark updated its digital strategy. The e-Government Strategy has launched a coordinated plan for the entire public sector. With regard to the educational sector, the strategy encompasses several areas: Example: . • Wireless networks in all classrooms by 2014. • All students should have access to a personal computer by 2014.- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 20, 2013 I think this trend may have some advantages with regard to including people with disabilities, because there is a certain overlap between making robust applications that can run on various devices and applications that are accessible for people with disabilities. - Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Sep 21, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013BYOD challenges the way many teachers teach since you no longer can assume that all you student will be able to use the same software and have the same capacity. It challenges the pedagogy in the classroom, opening for more teamwork and collaboration among students moving the classroom towards a more student centered learning environment. - Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Sep 22, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013- ingunn.kjol.wiig ingunn.kjol.wiig Sep 25, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik BYOD is both for PC/Mac and mobile devices, and overlaps with the mobile revolution - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 29, 2013 (- rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen Sep 29, 2013)
  • Computers as we know them are in the process of a massive reinvention. The computer is smaller, lighter, and better connected than ever before, without the need for wires or bulky peripherals. In many cases, smart phones and other mobile devices are sufficient for basic computing needs, and only specialized tasks require a keyboard, large monitor, and a mouse. Mobiles are connected to an ecosystem of applications supported by cloud computing technologies that can be downloaded and used instantly, for pennies. As the capabilities and interfaces of small computing devices improve, our ideas about when — or whether — a traditional computer is necessary are changing as well. - jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 20, 2013 People still think of computers as something you sit in front of. They are changing into true mobile devices. This will enable education to break out of the classroom.- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013- thomas.hepso thomas.hepso Sep 21, 2013 - Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Sep 21, 2013 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 22, 2013 Yes, but ... but ... As the user interface of this wiki demontrates, not all activities are well suited to a (small) mobile device. - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 26, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013
  • Education paradigms are shifting to include online learning, hybrid learning, and collaborative models. - ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 28, 2013Students already spend much of their free time on the Internet, learning and exchanging new information — often via their social networks. Institutions that embrace face-to-face/online hybrid learning models have the potential to leverage the online skills learners have already developed independent of academia. Online learning environments have distinct advantages over physical campuses, including opportunities for greater collaboration while equipping students with stronger digital skills. Hybrid models, when designed and implemented successfully, enable students to travel to campus for some activities, while using the network for others, taking advantage of the best of both - sven.o.brekke sven.o.brekke Sep 21, 2013 environments.- arne.krokan arne.krokan Sep 19, 2013 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 19, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013The vast variety of courses offered online should be a huge advantage for schools because it can change the way we look at learning. Instead punishing students who are absent from school, we should look at the work they do and what they have learnt. If we let more students use different arenas for learning, the teacher will have more time to help those who need it. In most cases students want academic challengesand they are able to perform amazingly if they have access to technology and at the same time have the trust from the teacher. ref our book connected learners. http://www.amazon.com/Connected-Learners-creating-classroom-ebook/dp/B00CYEFX8E/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1378450082&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=conected+learners Another aspect of this is the interest in the Flipped Classroom. I think the idea has great potential - ingunn.kjol.wiig ingunn.kjol.wiig Sep 25, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik (- rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen Sep 29, 2013) f we still focus on one size fits all we will have challenges, despite flipping the classroom. Will we need the traditional classroom in the future? - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik Writers are told "Show, do not tell" when they develop a story, YouTube does the same thing for learning outside the classroom. How does school incorporate these changes? - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013
  • Increasingly, students want to use their own technology for learning. As new technologies are developed at a more rapid and at a higher quality, there is a wide variety of different devices, gadgets, and tools from which to choose. Utilizing a specific device has become something very personal — an extension of someone’s personality and learning style — for example, the choice one makes between the iOS or the Android platforms. Students (and teachers) appreciate being able to give a presentation or conduct research with tools that are familiar and productive for them personally. As handheld technology continues to be ever more capable and more affordable, students often have access to more advanced equipment in their personal lives - sven.o.brekke sven.o.brekke Sep 21, 2013 than at school.- arne.krokan arne.krokan Sep 19, 2013 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 19, 2013- jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 20, 2013 - Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Sep 21, 2013- thomas.hepso thomas.hepso Sep 21, 2013- Liv.Dahlin Liv.Dahlin Sep 22, 2013 - ola.berge ola.berge Sep 22, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 29, 2013 (- rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen Sep 29, 2013) With HTML5 and responsive design the technologies of choice are less and less important. Students will choose their own technology, and they expect content and services to adapt to it. - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 26, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik the students and teachers will think less of tools, and more of function. What about the digital divide, and poor families in this context? - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013
  • Openness — concepts like open content, open data, and open resources, along with notions of transparency and easy access to data and information — is becoming a value. As authoritative sources lose their importance, there isneed for more curation and other forms of validation to generate meaning in information and media. “Open” has become a term often applied in very different contexts. Often mistaken to mean “free,” open education advocates are working towards a common vision that defines “open” more broadly — not just free in economic terms, but educational materials that are freely copiable, freely remixable, and free of barriers to access, sharing, and educational use. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 19, 2013 This is "true" in the sense that we have witnessed the emergence of NDLA (the most visible OER initiative in Norway) and the growth of "Del&Bruk" (Share and Use). But - or maybe BUT - we are not seeing a profound debate on a strategic and professional level about various concepts of openness. National authorities are not facilitating this kind of debate, and I doubt that discourses on professional learning in Norway put openness high on the agenda - jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 20, 2013 This is a challenge in Norwegians schools as teachers still prefer all-in-one solutions. - sven.o.brekke sven.o.brekke Sep 21, 2013 - ola.berge ola.berge Sep 22, 2013 "Openness" has little value unless there are common standards, formats and APIs. At the moment many content and service providers has silos as their business model. And since Norway is a small country, it is hard and expensive to challenge the ruling order. - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 23, 2013 Yesterday European Commission launched 'Opening up Education' to boost innovation and digital skills in schools and universities. From the report: All educational institutions need to improve their capacity to adapt, promote innovation and exploit the potential of technologies and digital content. In effect, however, institutional strategies tend to oppose openness to education that ICT provides.---Between 50% and 80% of students in EU countries never use digital textbooks, exercise software, broadcasts/podcasts, simulations or learning games. Most teachers at primary and secondary level do not consider themselves as 'digitally confident' or able to teach digital skills effectively, and 70% would like more training in using ICTs. ---The Commission will: - Ensure that all educational materials supported by Erasmus+ are available to the public under open licenses and promote similar practices under EU programmes; • Use the new programmes Erasmus+ and Horizon 2020 to encourage partnerships between creators of educational content (e.g. teachers, publishers, ICT companies), to increase the supply of quality OER and other digital educational materials in different languages, to develop new business models and to develop technical solutions which provide transparent information on copyrights and open licenses to users of digital educational resources; • Launch with this Communication the Open Education Europa portal linking it to existing OER repositories in different languages and bringing learners, teachers and researchers together, so to improve the attractiveness and visibility of quality OERs produced in the EU.- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 26, 2013 The development of OER's will force teachers and learners to use and create their own learning paths. You need to develop a pedagogic that are adjustet to OER's - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013
  • People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. This trend is certainly true for most adults, and many well-paying jobs literally can be done from anywhere that has a mobile Internet connection. It is also true for many of today’s school-age children, who live their lives in a state of constant connection to their peers, social groups, and family. While some decry the constant flow of information as a distraction or worse (with some justification), others see the opportunity to “flip” expectations about what is homework and what is schoolwork by taking advantage of those connections as learning opportunities. The implications for formal learning are profound, as flipping uses the resources on the Internet to free up valuable teacher classroom time, and fundamentally changes the teacher-student relationship. When students know how to use their network connections for more than texting, learning becomes much more serendipitous, opening the door to “just-in-time” learning, and “discovered” learning.- arne.krokan arne.krokan Sep 19, 2013 Connected learning as well as connected educators are areas that many countries see the value in. Ref Connected educator month in the USA in October. Learning this way requires connected teachers and learners. A skill that needs to be taught in school and a way of working that needs to be prioritized in school as well. - Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Ann.Sorum.Michaelsen Sep 22, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013 A necessary prerequisite is cheap and available wifi. We should be looking at something like eduroam for K-12 https://www.eduroam.org/ - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 25, 2013 For students to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want, education needs to provide them with the skill and competence to seek those opportunities. - jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 27, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik people still need people, and studens want to connect not only on a virtual level, but als in the physical space. But they will demand more flexible solutions
  • Social media is changing the way people interact, present ideas and information, and communicate. More than one billion people use Facebook regularly; other social media platforms extend those numbers to nearly one third of all people on the planet. Educators, students, and even the general public routinely use social media to share current events, opinions, and articles of interest. Likewise, scientists and researchers use social media to keep their communities informed of new developments. The fact that all of these various groups are using social media speaks to its effectiveness in engaging people. The impact of these changes in scholarly communication and on the credibility of information remains to be seen, but it is clear that social media has found significant traction in almost every education sector. It is not uncommon, for example, to see teachers using Facebook, Twitter, Google Hangouts, and other platforms to connect with their students.- arne.krokan arne.krokan Sep 19, 2013- jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 20, 2013It has also made it important to include how to behave responsible in social media. This is an objective for the digital basic skill in Norwegian curriculum. - thomas.hepso thomas.hepso Sep 21, 2013As what you say and the picture´s you post will not disappear. - sven.o.brekke sven.o.brekke Sep 21, 2013 A lot of students are using private FB-groups for discussing and doing homework with guide from other students- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013- ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 27, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik
    When students are looking for collaborative platforms, surely we must be able to give them something better than facebook! - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 26, 2013
  • The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based, and our notions of IT support are decentralized. The continuing acceptance and adoption of cloud-based applications and services is changing not only the ways we configure and use software and file storage, but also how we conceptualize those functions. It does not matter where our work is stored; what matters is that our information is accessible no matter where we are or what device we choose to use. Globally, in huge numbers, we are growing accustomed to a model of browser-based software that is device independent. While some challenges still remain, specifically with notions of privacy and sovereignty, the promise of significant cost savings is an important driver in the search for solutions.- arne.krokan arne.krokan Sep 19, 2013 - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Sep 19, 2013- jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 23, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik What about the need for sheltered learning spaces where you are allowed to make mistakes, and the Internet forgets your mistakes? - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013
  • Technology continues to profoundly affect the way we work, collaborate, communicate, and succeed. Increasingly, technology skills are critical to success in almost every arena, and those who are more facile with technology will advance while those without access or skills will not. The digital divide, once seen as a factor of wealth, is now seen as a factor of education: those who have the opportunity to learn technology skills are in a better position to obtain and make use of technology than those who do not. Evolving occupations, multiple careers, and an increasingly mobile workforce contribute to this trend. - sven.o.brekke sven.o.brekke Sep 21, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013- ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 28, 2013- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 29, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013
  • There is a new emphasis in the classroom on more challenge based, active learning. Challenge Based Learning and similar methods foster more active learning experiences, both inside and outside the classroom. As technologies such as tablets and smartphones now have proven applications in schools, educators are leveraging these tools, which students already use, to connect the curriculum with real life issues. The active learning approaches are decidedly more student-centered, allowing them to take control of how they engage with a subject and to brainstorm and implement solutions to pressing local and global problems. The hope is that if learners can connect the course material with their own lives and their surrounding communities, then they will become more excited to learn and immerse themselves in the subject matter.- ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 27, 2013 Studies of challenge-based learning in practice, including two authored by the NMC, depict an increase in the uptake of 21st Century Skills among learners, including leadership and creativity. - jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 23, 2013 Giving the students a challenge they can overcome with an effort is an excellent way of giving them a sense of mastery. Very important to combat drop-outs. Many of the resources produced by government agencies use this approach. - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 26, 2013 I would like to see something like the San Diego High Tech High in Norway, where the idea of making something (a product) is at the core of teaching and learning. See http://www.hightechhigh.org/
  • There is an increasing interest in using new sources of data for personalizing the learning experience and for performance measurement. As learners participate in online activities, they leave a clear trail of analytics data that can be mined for insights. Learning analytics experiments and demonstration projects are currently examining ways to use data for enrichment. Dashboards filter this information so that student progress can be monitored in real time. As the field of learning analytics matures, the hope is that this information will enable continual improvement of learning outcomes.- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013how can - snorre.lovas snorre.lovas Sep 25, 2013 As with cloud services there are big hurdles ahead when it comes to privacy and analytics - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 27, 2013There is also the problem of standards, formats and APIs. the IMS Caliper initiative may help.
  • The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured. This trend is being driven by the increasingly global and cooperative nature of business interactions facilitated by Internet technologies. The days of isolated desk jobs are disappearing, giving way to models in which teams work actively together to address issues too far-reaching or complex for a single worker to resolve alone. While this trend is not widespread, where schools have created a climate in which students, their peers, and their teachers are all working towards the same goals, where research is something open even to first year students, the results have shown tantalizing promise. Over the past few years, the emergence of a raft of new (and often free) tools has made collaboration easier than at any other point - arne.krokan arne.krokan Sep 19, 2013 - ola.berge ola.berge Sep 22, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 23, 2013- jostein.kvisteroy jostein.kvisteroy Sep 24, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013 But the "collaborative tools" of today are often stripped-down version of personal tools. They enable collaboration, but they teach "collaboration" as such. - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 26, 2013 Can we develop a new learning project methodology based on agile methods? Just a thought. - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 27, 2013Must be a lot of research from the CSCL where the goal has been to study collaborative learning which uses technology in a learning environment to help mediate and support group interactions in a collaborative learning context.- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013
  • There is increased focus on e-inclusion because of the Anti-Discrimination and Accessibility Act. (Article 11requires universal design of information technology directed towards the general public). Although not covering the educational sector (yet), there is an increased awareness inindustry and among developers to focus on universal design. This means an increased focus on usability and accessibility of applications in general and hopefully also in the case of learning applications. When usability and accessibility is taken care of, the learner can focus entirely on the learning experience. One interesting variation of universal design isability-based design, i.e do not focus on disability, but rather on strengthening the users abilities. - Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Kristin.Skeide.Fuglerud Sep 21, 2013- per.hetland per.hetland Sep 24, 2013 - ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 28, 2013Unfortunately pupils and teachers are not considered part of the "general public". K-12 is excepted from the information technology regulation because the rights of pupils are already formulated in the Norwegian Education Act (which doesn´t mention information technology). - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 25, 2013
  • The increased use of visual information has increased the need for visual competence. Different technologies make the use of visual information more crucial and at the center of a lot of activities in digital and social media. This makes it necessary to learn how to make and use visual elements to express yourself and to "read" others. Children, young people and adults' everyday life is full of visual impact that is read and interpreted on different levels. This can be seen in the increased use of images as a means of communication in social media and the amount of images used. The need for this knowledge is increasingly necessary as students and teachers all the time deal with visual information. A visual world requires knowledge to be able to read and interpret for thus in turn to produce digital products with a good visual content and expression. This can be described through six key visual categories which greatly affects the digital media today: 1) Text and symbols: Text, graphs, lines, letters, symbols and wordclouds. 2) Information Graphics: How to create and interpret visual representations of information such as statistics by color, size, text, shape, symbols and silhouettes. 3) Digital Drawing: Mindmaps, digital notes and sketches. 4) Illustration and documentation of daily life. 5) Moving Images: Film, video, digital storytelling and animation. 6) Pictures as artistic expression: Being able to create and interpret various art forms through working with different visual effects. - Liv.Dahlin Liv.Dahlin Sep 22, 2013 Use of video for learning how to play Minecraft, and lack of written documentation is one example of this trend. Visual skills matter more than before - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013 (- rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen Sep 29, 2013)
  • We are facing the emergence of national administrative solutions and a standardized architecture. At present, a large tender is underway for the acquisition of a national student administrative system (SAS) for upper secondary education (all county councils) and the City of Oslo. This may pave the way for more nationwide solutions. The work on a common IT architecture for higher education in Norway may have a have trickel-down effect on primary and secondary education.
  • New opportunities, like learning analytics, are driving deployment of interoperability standards for learning technologies. Teachers, school administrators, and researchers are expecting to be able to harvest the rich data provided by various systems used in our schools for learning analytics and accountability issues. Students expect the ability to use a wide range of devices, and their data to flow seamlessly through all their applications. Purchasing staffs are increasingly cautious of vendor lock-in. Systems implementing specifications that facilitate interoperability will be in higher demand. One hopes. - ola.berge ola.berge Sep 22, 2013 Learning Analytics should be about "empowering the student", but at the moment there are serious privacy concerns around the use of user-generated data (at least in Europe). - morten.dahl morten.dahl Sep 25, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik - ingrid.melve ingrid.melve Sep 29, 2013
  • Transformation trends in education include cloud computing, ubiquitious connectivity, ubiquitous devices, NUI, and social networks. These globale trends are key drivers for changing how ICT is used and how tools & content are developed by content providers and ISV's. These are changing and improving providers ability to develop and present content in much more interesting, agile and flexible ways accessible for anyone. Ongoing investments in infrastructure to increase access to internet and access to various devices will enable any student to attend classes cross boarders, cross language and provide access to top learning experiences from any location. As online content continue to develop we will see better and new tools for structuring curriculum and to provide learners, teachers and school owners tools to better manage the learning process and learning styles. - bjornarh bjornarh Sep 22, 2013 (- rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen rolf.oistein.barman-jenssen Sep 29, 2013)
  • Connected learning is on the rise. Ways of moving beyond formal, non-formal and informal ways of learning. (http://connectedlearning.tv/) - ola.erstad ola.erstad Sep 29, 2013
  • Knowledge creation is increasing. More emphasis on applications suited different subject areas, and also to support user-generated content creation. - ola.erstad ola.erstad Sep 29, 2013
  • Technologies that facilitates or assist the development of self-regulation are being leveraged. Ambiquitious connectivity, ambiquitious devices, games and social networks does not only create positive opportunities but also creates new challenges and many of these relate to the need to regulate onself (e.g. stop playing a fun game and start with school work). The need to develop regulation skills seems prominent. Self-regulation is not easy for children (or adults for that matter) and this is a skill that one need to foster from an early age. Also networks that can be easily turned off (accesses to the internet) might become a trend - ingvill.rasmussen ingvill.rasmussen Sep 28, 2013 - June.M.Breivik June.M.Breivik- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Sep 29, 2013
  • Increasingly, schools are experimenting with classroom space design. One such example is the Future Classroom Lab. The Future Classroom Lab is created by European Schoolnet, its supporting 30 ministries and industry partners to help visualise how conventional classrooms and other learning spaces can be easily reorganised to support changing styles of teaching and learning. The Future Classroom Lab in Brussels is a fully equipped, reconfigurable, teaching and learning space developed by European Schoolnet, its 30 supporting Ministries of Education and leading educational technology providers.- morten.soby morten.soby Sep 20, 2013 [Editor's Note: Moved here from RQ 2]
  • Another trend here. (Start with a bolded statement (one complete sentence) and then provide a brief description.)

Added as a New Challenge to RQ 4

  • New ways of learning challenge the way we measure and document the value of knowledge and skills. The way we measure will affect the learning process. Relevant evaluation forms and relevant ways to demonstrate knowledge and skills must be developed. The challenge is perhaps more legal and organizational than technical. The Mooc phenomenon challenges the university sector in evaluation methods and documentation of knowledge. Similar challenges will have to come in K-12 schools.- vegard vegard Sep 29, 2013